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THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 



/\ 



ANNUAL REPORT 



Year Ending June 30, 1963 



DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 



P'a)- a No 270 oppr©red by Alt t>d C. Hcliomd, Slate P «.g Age/ 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 
Dr, Owen B. Kiernan, Commissioner 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
Mrs. George S. Tattan - Supervisor of Social Service 



BOARD OF THE DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 

Term Expires 

I96U Mrs. Marian Bullen, Cambridge 

19 6U Mrs, Clementina Langone, Boston 

1Q65 Mrs a Edith Brickman, Boston 

1965 Mrso Carol Offenbach, Melrose 
i960 Mrs. Gemma Valenti, Medford 

1966 Mr. Robert Patenaude 



DISTRICT EMIGRATION AGENTS 



Mr. Andrew W. Ansara - Lawrence Office,. 301 Essex Street 

Mr. Daniel J. Donahue - Fall River Office, *1 Franklin Street 

Mr. John A.o Mclnnes - Springfield Office, 235 Chestnut Street 

Mr. Edmund B. Meduski - Worcester Office, 7U Front Street 



ANNUAL REPORT 
DIVISION OF IMMIGRATION AND AMERICANIZATION 
YEAR ENDING JUNE 30, 19 63 

Forty-six years of service was completed by the Division of Immigration and 
Americanization at the end of the fiscal year June 30> 1963* The Division has been 
a part of the Department of Education for forty-four years or since 19 39 • Some 
LOjOOO services were recorded: Boston, 5jOH6; Fall River, 3, 75U^ Lawrence, 5,3hh; 
Springfield, 3, oil; Worcester, 5,271; serving some 20,000 individuals in practically 
every city and town of the Commonwealth in fulfilling its duties as outlined in 
Chapter 69 Section 11 as amended by Chapter I4O9, Acts of 1939: 

"The Division of Immigration and Americanization shall' employ 
such methods, consistent with law, as in its judgment, will 
tend to bring into sympathetic and mutually helpful relations 
the Commonwealth and its residents of foreign origin, protect 
immigrants from exploitation and abuse, stimulate their 
acquisition and mastery of English, develop their understand- 
ing of American government, institutions and ideals, and 
generally promote their assimilation and naturalization. " 

An increase of 2,000 services over last year was mainly due to change of status 
cases of persons from countries of political upheaval, as Cuba, South American and 
Central American countries. The increased workload handled, attests to the strain 
and pressure of work on the personnels, A replacement of a Social Worker this year - 
by a Spanish speaking Social Worker - has been of the greatest assistance in our work 
with the many Cubans and Spanish speaking client s, The fact of an increased workload 
proves the need of replacement of the Social Worker and Clerk-Stenographer positions 
cut three years ago in this Division, 

NATIONALITIES OF CLIENTS 

This year, for our nationality - or place of birth - statistical background, our 
list comprised some 100 nationalities with separate designations for Central and 
South American countries, etc. Because of political situations in many of these 
countries, many persons from Haiti, Panama, Dominican Republic, as well as Argentina 
and Venezuela, sought our assistance in adjustment of status to permanent residents 
from their temporary status of visitors or students in the United States The newer 
countries, as Ghana, Kenya, Vietnam, are also recorded. The nationalities of appli- 
cants were recorded as follows: 

Italy 7,5U5 (Boston - 5,077) 

Canada h 3 9^h (Boston -' 2,991) 

United States U,o70 

Portugal 3jl3U (Fall River'- 2,160) 

Cuba 2,535 (Boston - 1,U56) 

Poland 2,236 

Greece lj99U (Boston - 1,107) 

Ireland l,u75 (Boston - l,Ul6) 

Germany 1,U77 

China 1,276 (Boston - 073) 

England 966 

Jamaica 660 

Hungary 619 

France 5 03 

U a S,S.R. I4OO etc. 



The past year showed an increase especially in Cuban born persons of which 
Massachusetts has some U,000, it is estimated,, 

LOCALITIES SERVED BY THE DIVISION 

As usual, the greatest number of services were recorded for the cities where we 
maintain our offices and where the agents from Fall River and Lawrence Offices visit 
weekly for services to New Bedford and Lowell residents. The major localities are: 



Boston 


ll'.k&i 


Worcester 


3,U60 


Springfield 


2,1U2 


Fall River 


2,097 


Lawrence 


2,371 


Cambridge 


1,550 


Lowell 


l,U6l 


New Bedford 


1,002 


Somervillc 


953 



MASSACHUSETTS FOREIGN BORII 

Foreign stock, as defined by the Census Bureau, is comprised of foreign born 
persons and natives born of foreign, or mixed foruign and native parentage. In the 
United States, one in each five United States residents is of foreign stock, accord- 
ing to the i960 census results. In Massachusetts, the so-called "foreign stock" is 
\\0% of the total population^ 

TOTAL POPULATION - MASSACHUSETTS „ 5,Hi9,317 

Native born .«.. •»••••••;•••• h 9 572, 065 - 00,0$ 

Native parentage 3,091,OOd - 60$ 

Foreign or mixed parentage .l,Udl,o57 - 20 o G$ 
Foreign born . , 9 576,U52 - 11.2/b 

Persons in Massachusetts of "foreign stock" are 2,050,309 or h0% of the total 
population of the State. The census breakdown of countries of origin for this is as 
follows : 

Country of Origin 

Canada 5H7,236 

Italy 311,053 

Ireland • £76,166 

United Kingdom 193,137 

Poland 136, 9U2 

U.S.S.R. .129^306 



Portugal 95;, 32 

Germany $h 9 7Uu 

Sweden 51,101 

Lithuania UO,921 

Asia hO,hlk 

Greece 3U,007 

Other Europe 19,050 

Finland lO,70o 

Austria 17,Oo9 

Other America 16,270 

France 13,100 



Country of Origin 



Not Reported 




11,760 


Norway 




10,501 


All Other 




9,506 


Czechoslovakia 




6,303 


Denmark 




5,069 


Netherlands 




5i3U7 


Hungary 




• 1,979 


Rumania 




3,351; 
3,006 


Switzerland 




Yugoslavia 




1,1*02 


Mexico 




1,305 


TOTAL FOREIGN 


STOCK 


2,050,309 


NON-CITIZENS IN 


THIS STaTE 



Massachusetts still ranks seventh with number of alien residents. The registra- 
tion of aliens required in January, recorded 132,771; - ail increase of 2,000 over the 
last year. Of these, 123,1;06 are permanent residents and 9,200 are in temporary 
status with the nationalities recorded as follows: 

Canadian 31,997 

Italian 15, 650 

United Kingdom 10,701 

Poland 0,615 

Ireland 6,716 

Germany 5^200 

U.S.S R. 2,lu3 

Netherlands 1,596 

Cuba l,0l;2 

Japan 506 

Mexico 107 

All Other 39,053 

Other than Permanent 9,200 

The total number of aliens in the United States is 3,236, 6<3U» The states re- 
cording over 100,000 are: 

California 710,Ul9 

New York 600,1;06 

Texas 2ul,001 

Illinois 19U,279 

Florida 102,250 

New Jersey 159, Sh9 

Massachusetts 132, 7?U 

Michigan 129,160 

Pennsylvania 109,737 



AltE NEW IMMIGRANTS BEING ADMITTED TO THE UNITED STATES 

In the last fiscal year, a total of 2o3,7o3 immigrants were admitted to the 
United States - the highest it has been in the past five years. Of this number, 
ll,5>7o gave Massachusetts as. their destination. Their countries of birth were re- 
corded as follows; 



Canada 


3,209 


Italy 


1,299 


United Kingdom 


1,096 


Germany 


720 


Ireland 


666 


Poland 


k33 


Greece 


3k'6 


Scandinavian 


236 


Cuban 


101* 


Chinese 


113 etc 



Boston was the city designated as final destination by 1,761 of the above total 
immigrants, and, of these, their nationalities were: 



Italian 


295 


Canadian 


27U 


Irish 


212 


United Kingdom 


199 


German 


79 



There has been no change in the Immigration Laws, but the increase is attributed 
to various laws enacted in the past few years as P.L. d7-du'5 granting nonquota status 
to brothers, sisters, etc,, waiting quota numbers since prior to March 30, 195k* The 
countries mostly benefited were, Italy, Greece and Portugal. 

NEWCOMERS 

We send a letter of welcome offering our services to each newly arrived immigrant 
in this Commonwealth,, Last year, we assisted 2,UliO such persons in matters of adjust- 
ment and assimilation in their new home. They came to us requiring referrals to 
proper schools for their children, for evening classes for adults and vocational edu- 
cation, as well as sources to apply for scholarships. Draft registration require- 
ments have been explained, as well as referrals made to the proper boards for regis- " 
tration, requirements for obtaining certain licenses to carry on work of electricians, 
as well as professional registry for doctors and nurses, pharmacists, etc. The 
obtaining of driver's licenses were important to a salesman and a truck driver whose 
intense application in learning to read English enabled them to pass the examination 
These have been some of the types of assistance rendered in addition to asking about 
job opportunities, citizenship and immigration matter s« 

The immigration quotas have caused many family separations in this class of new- 
comers to the United States. Typical is the case of the young Italian girl e As a 
minor, 19 years old, she had been able to enter the United States with her parents 
because her father benefited under P.L. 07-085 as he had been registered and waiting 
his turn to come to the United States since prior to March, 195k* After working in 
the United States for a year, she decided to return to marry her fiance she had left 
in Italy. She visited there, married and returned to America within a few months. 



Although^ shu has made all the necessary petitions, because she is not a citizen, her 

reSsterS ^L e S^ tled \° *S£ Proference category status. Those in that status 

mother rac^ -I TOaly V 96 ? °*° n ° W Betting thelr turns " She is « expectant 
t?on n. w g a + lon f. se P^ atl °n from her husband and only enactment of new legisla- 

!V r hl! Zl I ^ f t0r oom P lot i°n of ^e necessary residence requirements, 
sep^tiorfof f J5fv £ husband 3^« her in the United States. This ^situation'. 

Greece Porfi^S 3 ° aUS ° £ <TIOta " is especially acute in countries such as 
Greece, Portugal, China, as well as Italy. 

CUBANS 

ii OOO^wf ^ " iS c ; S l imC - te ' i that in Massachusetts there are resident some 

this°Co^™:ealthTr™ S Fl rid^foTreseWlem^t" ° nt ^T " ^ f *** ^ "° 
st-tr.<5 Tr, +v«. ' Z 'J-ona^ tor resettlement - and who are parolees to the United 

h*ve initi"tr? ^ , 7ear We , haV6 had °° nta0t Wlth 2 >™ Cubans - Fot 123 of them, we 
inlhe United S?^^ 03 "* aSSlStGd th ° ra ±n o^i^g legal, permanent residence 
in Canada st John I ^T* a ?P lication f ° r Migrant visas at noarby consulates 
^ e ™ p„" f ohn > lfcw Brunswick; Toronto, Ontario; but mostly at Montreal, 

s^ t.o h^vo a ST \ as T dootors ' ^tists and nurses have found that is nooes- 

profession in the Un^t "^°f Into ^ lon ln ord er to got a license to practice their 
manent re-idlco T™X ^V*' ThiS haS initlat od their desire to get legal, per- 
ana asked' = for £l, * *7 0Un 8 mo " wanted to enlist into the U. S. Armed Forces 

m"rlied United St.tor^ t ln ad;iust ^ nt of teir status. Several young ladies who had 
really bcion° t '• ° c i tlzcns > as "oil as many persons with a sincere- desire to 
en^into the U^teTsWo ^ ^ aSSiSt ° d ln es tablishing a legal, permanent 
procedures for thorn ™? * l°* m ° n7 > ri - turn to Cuba would neTCr be possible. The 
recessarv do^> , o q mU ° h corre '>pond e nco, translations of documents, procuring 

menL b^LL an anooinW° S ^w^ complying with ail the Migration la/require- 
appearance of tto^f t ^ th ° °° nSul is obtained and before the personal 
Because or neces^arf invent / n t Canada ^r issuance of Immigrant visa Is possible, 
has taken as lon^ ^ v ^ tx f atlons ™ d obtaining security and other clearances, it 

the SsTaftto ContulaSs! ^ *" "*" "^ *° °° mplCtC P™?*"™ "* °btain 

relatives^ hopper Jotff ^ 122 a PP llcations f °r "Overs'- in the past year for 
Cubar Although in Lftf + \ Pe ™ 1SS10n f ° r thum to cntcT th ° Un «od States from 
State hd been grated ]°cw? t^*' *? neoessaI> y divers from the Department of 

Many of "the relaW f^ W K1 ^^^^ ?* *»? th ° * ^ lcm ' 
Mexico and we havo ,„i„ ft ° g0 to s P cln > so,ne to Jamaica and even to 

United states in flit e^^ »eo°ssary affidavits of support for their sponsors in the 
United States. CaSeS * Fr ° m ° Uba thurc ls no transportation to the 

travel ^othSl^r^^^^LKfo™^ ^V^^ in &*»**» regarding 
ship aDclication* rZ rl?L i information; work opportunities; as well as citizon- 

lSge eFEnglish and our So "" ° ■ ^L* A great many ° f thosc applicants lack know- 
her g kno„led|e of ?his lan™^e ' ^^^Socxal Worker has extensively made use of 
communities. l^age. It is estimated that the Cubans reside in 60 of our 

IMMIGRATION PROBLEMS 

0,«O J ?e^ 8 lS e S%^^1^. 1 T l ^*l«',^» -re requested of us by 
P.L. 07^-805 which snoc^l^n; .™ e < , onl { u migration legislation enacted in 1962 was- 

sisters, married children of X£% ^f h pr + ofcronce cat ogory applicants as brothers, 
, ..rrice children of United States citizens and their spouses and minor chil- 



drcn who are registered and awaiting their quota since prior to March 30, 195U. This 
law benefited many of our clients and created more work in such cases as a family 
registered on the waiting list so long that the family situation had changed* Several 

children had married, another unmarried daughter had become of age. The father in 
this case came alone. His wife could have accompanied him but she preferred tc wait 
until her unmarried daughter, who lived with them, was able to get proper visa also* 
This required new petitions by the father immediately on his arrival into the United 
States; affidavits of support and the usual correspondence with the Consul abroad. 
The mother and unmarried daughter were able to join the father in the United States 
within six months* However, close family ties leave this family concerned and' anxious 
to have the married daughter and her family reunited with them Under the law, no 
preferential status is accorded her and she faces an undeterminable wait to come to 
the United States* Her parents, or sister, will have to bo naturalized and then 
create a preferential status for her - in spite of the fact that she has a registra- 
tion priority now in the nonpreferencc category - before March 30, 195U» The case 
cited concerned an Italian family, but this same dilemma is repeated for persons in 
many other countries - Portugal, Greece, Yugoslavia, etc, where there are so many 
registrants awaiting visas and the quotas are small. 

For applicants in Canada, where there is no quota, Ireland and Great Britain, 
who have such large quotas that they have never been filled, it is only the problem 
of a sponsorship and assurance that such persons will not become public charges in 
the United States. 2,dU2 affidavits of support, which were executed for sponsors, 
included many in this category. 

Knowledge of Immigration Laws, techniques and procedures is most essential, in 
addition to a foreign language ability - necessary not only in communication with the 
clients, but most important in the translation of official documents such as birth 
and marriage records and police clearances,, Our staff is comprised of some social 
workers with a knowledge of many such foreign languages* 

CHANGE OF STATUS WHILE IN THE UNITED STATES 



Last year we had 533 cases of persons changing status while in the United States 
In this category are visitors who came, married a United States citizen and whom we 
then assisted in filing all the necessary petitions and applications Appearances 
with them at hearings before the United States Immigration Service before they are 
granted permanent residence in the United States was required-, A number of these 
included Canadians who entered as visitors and who then initiated action to get visas 
while they were in the United States. Some of them were elderly parents whom the 
citizen child had brought into the United States as a visitor and who now wants the 
parent to reside permanently in America* This procedure necessitates much correspon- 
dence with the consuls in Canada, filing many forms and documents before an appoint- 
ment is arranged with the Consul in Canada and the alien travels there for the visa 
and reenters as a permanent resident of the United States* 

The past year has shown the stringent enforcement of laws for persons in the 
United States under the Exchange Student or Visitor Programs© In the past, those who 
had married citizens of the United States and who desired tc remain in the United 
States were able to prove hardship to the citizen spouse and were granted a "Waiver" 
of the two years rosidence In the past year, to our knowledge, only two such cases 
were granted in this arca 



S 






CITIZENSHIP im NATURALIZATION ASSISTANCE 

Last year, 5,197 persons were naturalized in Massachusetts* Our records show 
that our offices filled 2,359 applications to initiate the procedure for naturaliza- 
tion. 

Nation-wise, it has been established that the median age for males naturalized 
was J,C and the female 3U©3 and that two thirds of the persons naturalized had entered 
the United States between the years of 19$k and 1956, However, the 8.1 year old lady 
assisted in our office, after 71 years residence in the United States, and the 77 
year old Canadian lady applying after sixty years residence in the United States, are 
among the exceptions. It may be interesting to note the nationality of persons nat- 
uralized in Massachusetts of which the larger groups were: 



Italian 


1,321* 


Canada 


71U 


Greece 


Ii75 


German 


U52 


Ireland 


396 


United Kingdom 


353 


Poland 


225 


China 


119 



There were 5h£ applications completed for persons to get proof of citizenship 
derived through parents* After due process, these applicants were given a Certifi- 
cate of Derivative Citizenship in their own names Q Finny of the applications were for 
minors whose parents had just become naturalized. The new citizen is more aware of 
the necessity of proof of citizenship and is anxious that proof of citizenship be 
issued the children also. 

However, one of the more complicated applications was completed for an Irish 
born gentleman, now 07 years of age, who had lived in the United States since the age 
of five* He had no relatives remaining who could assist him in establishing his 
exact place of birth and port of entry into the United States, By correspondence 
with authorities abroad, the necessary birth record and marriage record of his parents 
were obtained. Old school records in Boston established his childhood residence in 
the United States and his fat her T s date of naturalization was verified from records 
of the Reigstrar of Voters, Happily, Mr, T, was able to get his United States Pass- 
port with this proof of his Derivative Citizenship and he visited his birthplace 
after absence of GO years. 

Declaration of Intention, not a requirement for naturalization, are still issued 
to applicants who require them for certain occupations as Doctors, Nurses, to join 
unions, as well as to get security clearances in positions with firms having govern- 
ment contracts, Wg filled applications for 179 persons in our offices. 

Under recent rulings of the Department of State, we assisted a number of American 
born persons, who had lived abroad for many years, to regain their United States citi- 
zenship. Some had service in foreign armies. By appeal and filing of proof of desire 
and intent to retain United States citizenship and proving certain facts, the United 
States Citizenship was reinstated. Their records showing return to America as aliens 
were changed and now recorded them as citizens,, 



PUBLIC RELATIONS 

Cooperation with many private and public social agencies continues to our 
mutual benefit* We are fortunate to have good relationship with the United 
States Immigration and Naturalization Service from whom we receive' assistance 
and cooperation. Cooperation with teachers and adult Civic groups, Supervisors 
and Directors, continues* 

Leaders of foreign groups and social service agencies have called on us for 
assistance and explanation of immigration laws and encouragement toward naturali- 
zation. The work and assistance given by our offices has been explained before 
groups, addresses on the radio and a television broadcast arranged by the Board 
of the Division of Immigration and Americanization. The Board of the Division 
appeared with the Supervisor of Social Service on this telecast and questions on 
the work of the Division asked by the panel were answered,, 

PROPOSED NATIONAL LEGISLATION IT! EMIGRATION 

Generally, there is apathy to the question of immigration even though many 
concede to the fact that the domestic economy of the United States in the past has 
been built by the labor of the immigrant. There has been no major change in leg- 
islation since the enactment of the Waltcr-McCarran Law of 1952. 

Although the past few years have produced several bills which were introduced 
in Congress to change the inequities of quotas based on the formula of permitting 
1/6 of 1% of foreign born persons recorded in the 1920 census, no action has been 
taken. However, this past year has raised the hopes of advocates for "Modernizing" 
the immigration laws through President Kennedy's Message: 

"I recommend that there be substituted for the national 
origins system a formula governing immigration to the 
United States which takes into account (l) skills of the 
immigrant and their relationship to our needs, (2) the 
family relationship between immigrants and persons already 
here, so that the reuniting of families is encouraged, and 
(3) the priority of registration. Present law grants a 
preference to various relatives of United States citizens 
and lawfully resident aliens.- But it does so only within 
a national origins quota. It should be modified so that 
those with the greatest ability to add to the national 
welfare, no matter where they were born, are granted the 
highest priority. The next priority should go to those 
who seek to be reunited with their relatives. As between 
applicants with equal claims the earliest registrant 
should be the first admitted. 

The President then recommended that: 

"existing quotas be reduced gradually, at the rate of 20$ 
a year. The quota numbers released each year would be 
be placed in a quota reserve pool, to be distributed on 

.the new basis. 



"natives of no one country receive over 10%.. of the total 
quota numbers authorized in any one year* This will 
insure that the pattern of immigration is not distorted 
by excessive demand from any one country 

"the President be authorized, after receiving recommen- 
dations from a 7-man Immigration Board, to reserve up 
to $0% of the unallocated quota numbers, for issuance 
to persons disadvantaged by the change in the quota 
system, and up to 20% to refugees whose sudden disloca- 
tion requires special treatment. The Immigration 
Board will be composed of 2 members appointed by the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, 2 members 
appointed by the President Pro Tempore of the Senate, 
and 3 members appointed by the President „ In addition 
to its responsibility for formulating recommendations 
regarding the use of quota reserve pool, the Board 
will make a continuous study of our immigration policy*" 

The message incorporated in a Bill S.1932 and H O R.77O0, would increase quotas 
from I56,6d7 to about l65,000 o It would arrange to utilize all quotas unused as for 
countries like England whoro the quota has never been filled. Nonquota status itfould 
be given all people of free countrius in the Western Hemisphere and would be extended 
to Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, nonquota status would be given parents of United 
States and preference status to parents of aliens in the United States<> Fourth pre- 
ferential status would be accorded persons in occupations in short supply in the 
United States, as well as cnlargening the definition of persons eligible to enter the 
United States as refugees. 

Those of us knowing the problems of family separations caused by quota inequi- "* 
tics, look forward to enactment of such legislation. There is no doubt, however, ' 
that any new legislation always creates additional work for our staff 

Our nation is a symbol of freedom and the world looks to us for concrete ways 
this freedom is achieved. The world also looks to America to build a mutual security 
system with our allies abroad to join the energies of all free people in the struggle 
against Communism* 

This Division, under the Commonwealth of Massachusetts^ is a symbol of assistance 
advocating understanding of our principles and ideals of United States Government and 
makes for a better Commonwealth and respect for our Nation. 

SPRINGFIELD OFFICE 

A total of 3, ell services were rendered by the Springfield Office to residents 
of Western Massachusetts, 

Individuals came to us frcm 1|6 communities in the area, Wo had correspondence 
from ill former residents of this State seeking advice. Of the lj.0 nationalities re- 
corded this year, natives of Canada were the leading racial group. Natives of the 
United States, Italy, Germany and England t made up the major nationalities. 



During the year, U97 letters were mailed to newly arrived immigrants destined to 
reside in our district. We informed them of the services available to them and they 
wore invited to call upon us to assist them with their problems* Education was 
stressed as an important factor for naturalization. A report from one of these new- 
comers follows: 

"Dear Sir: I have received your letter this last few days 
tolling me of my welcome in your beautiful country and I 
hold very hard in thanking you sincerely,, I am very happy 
of my living here permanently, also I would like to profit 
the question that you want to tell me in regards of becoming 
a citizen of the U.S. A, Also, I would like to received 
your booklet telling me of the question and answers for 
citizenship. How long does it take to get naturilize? I 
would also like information of the location of such class. 
I do not speak good English. I read write and understand 
just a little bit, but all this writing is my own hand 
writing. In regard to the location of school, I would 
prefer to go in Chicopoc instead of Springfield. I thank 
you very much for all information that you would like to 
tell me and the trouble of you in writing to me and my 
kind to you 3 Respectfully yours,". 

Considerable publicity was given in this area' when a letter and leaflet, out- 
lining our work and services available to the residents of the Commonwealth, were 
sent to city and town clerks, clerks of court, community councils, travel agencies, 
churches of foreign denominations and organizations representing ethnic groups. 

Requests for special education and naturalization, as well as for certificates 
of citizenship, continue to come to us from dependents of the members of the Armed 
Forces. 

A tremendous number of inquiries were received from individuals in reference to 
bringing relatives from abroad to reside permanently in the United States. Due to 
the fact that the relatives were born in countries with oversubscribed quotas, there 
is no immediate hope of them coming to the United States, perhaps for many years. In 
the majority of these cases, a person is not only able to financially provide for 
relatives, but is able to provide them with the better way of life and to relieve 
them of their personal hardships due to conditions that exist in their own country. 
Because so many of these people have relatives residing in countries with small 
annual quotas, they were advised to contact their immediate members of Congress to 
ask if they will give favorable consideration to one or more of the numerous bills 
filed to change the annual quotas 

We assisted 20 persons to adjust their stay in the United States from temporary 
to permanent residents. They included visitors and studonts e -We also assisted two 
Cuban Parolees in making arrangements to apply for permanent visas at Montreal, 
Canada. Appearance was made by the District Agent before the Immigration and Natu- 
ralization Service representing individuals at Deportation Hearings, 

Our many efforts to unite families' who have been separated for many years were 
most rewarding. One case in particular, which was brought to conclusion this year, 
concerned a native of China separated from his wife and four children in 1950 when 
China was taken over by its present government a The man entered the United States 
as a deserting seaman in 1953 o His family managed to flee to China and entered Hong 
Kong in 1956. On June 15, 1959; his stay in the United States was adjusted to that 



of a permanent resident. Immediately upon this' adjustment, we assisted him to file 
the necessary petition to classify his dependents for third preference visas under 
the Chinese quota. With the passage of P.L. 07-301, Act of September 26, l°6l, his 
wife and children became eligible for nonquota visas© We then assisted him in execu- 
ting the required affidavit of support. Because of the delay in processing the great 
number of cases at Hong Kong, this family did not enter the United States until 
October 22, 1962. All are now residing, in New York City, as the head of the family 
found employment offering a better income. From time to time, we hear from this 
gentleman who expressed his happiness now that he has buon reunited with his family. 
He reports that his oldest son, twenty years of age, is now attending college and 
that the three boys are attending high school and primary grades. 

The District Agent appeared at final hearings for naturalization held at Spring- 
field. The courtesies and recognition shown to the Division by the Justices of the 
Superior Court, Clerk of the Superior Court and the Naturalization Examiner are appre- 
ciated. 

Just before the closing of the year, the entire membership of the official Board 
of the Division, accompanied by the Supervisor, visited the Springfield Office, held 
their monthly Board Meeting and discussed the work in the area. 

After a period of 7 years, the United States Immigration Service reopened a full- 
time office at Springfield. We received complete and valuable assistance from their 
representatives. With the reopening, it has been possible for us to expedite many 
important matters. 

Public and private agencies continue to call upon us for services to our mutual 
benefit , 

WORCESTER OFFICE 

The total numerical statistical count remains fairly consistent at 5,271 for the 
year, with 3,350 persons assisted,, 

Quoting the first two paragraphs of an article in the Worcester Telegram which 
aptly describes the situation: "countless generations of new Americans have passed 
through the door of the unpretentious little office on the seventh floor at 7U Front 
Street, and despite current restrictive immigration regulations, the tide of people 
continues to knock at that door". 

Even at that, we placed some emphasis on publicity. In November, sixty-three 
flyers regarding the Division of Immigration and Americanization were mailed to: 13 
schools and school departments ; 2 foundations; G hospitals; 15 foreign speaking clubs; 
industrial companies; 1 army camp; 2 newspapers and 1$ social agencies and others. 
Most of the personnel know of our location but not the types of services available. 

After contacting the churches in this area, the assistance offered to aliens by 
our office in complying with the January Report Program was announced from the pul- 
pits and church papers during the month; previously, they only mentioned that regis- 
tration cards were available at all United Status Post Offices, 

Speeches by the Agent, explaining the functions of the. Division and of the 
Worcester Office, were made before various groups, such' ass The Massachusetts 
Department of Education Administrative Workshop for recently appointed superintendents 
and principals, held at the State College of Framingham, Massachusetts; the staff of 
Traveler l s Aid Society, Worcester, Massachusetts; and an Americanization class at the 
Lamartine Street School, Worcester, Massachusetts, 



C.'iccrniu, tho lcttfaP place, the school is located in an area of the city which 
is inhabited by many persons requiring the services of this office. Thirteen count- 
pies -were represented in the classroom with a predominance of Greeks, Italians and 
Poles. The ages of the students range from teenagers to 77 years old, including a 
lawyer and an ox-colonel, studying the fundamentals of the English language* 3y the 
way, most of them cannot "wait" to complete the necessary residence requirements in 
order to apply for naturalization. 

Educational aids fere used to illustrate the talks; that is, homemade posters to 
explain the preferences under the quota system and a battery-operated tape recorder 
to enumerate naturalization and immigration statistics. 

Typical of assistance in adjustment of status have been as follows: Assisting 
several Cuban doctors who came as refugee parolees to obtain permanent visas at the 
United States Consulate, Montreal, Canada. This was important so that they could 
file a Declaration of Intention and ret registered in the Commonwealth and give their 
services as doctors in certain medical positions. One of these doctors did not have 
a valid passport, but he managed to cross the Canadian border to the Consular Office 
with a "Certificate of Identity" that we prepared for him. 

Four young nuns from Uganda, Africa, who came here for studies and further train- 
ing but are remaining for religious work, were assisted, through procedure, to become 
residents of the United States. Because the quota for Uganda was available, they 
were able to apply for such adjustment of status. 

An Exchange Visitor Scientist from India who had his application for a waiver 
of the 2 year foreign residence requirement started at the beginning of 1°62, was 
denied a few months later. He appealed and finally the waiver was granted in June, 
1963 on the grounds of hardship- to his citizen spouse if he had to leave the United 
States. Thus, he too, was aided to go through the process to get permanent residence. 

We encouraged and completed an "Application to File Petition for Naturalization" 
for a woman born in Sweden in 1GG5 and who resided in the United States since 1G91 
for a total of 71 years. 

Another unusual case involved citizenship', as well as immigration, of a woman 
born in Italy in 1913 but claiming United States citizenship through her father who 
was naturalized before her birth. The immigration cf her entire family was affected. 
At one time, she was informed by the American Consul in Italy that she had lost her 
citizenship because she failed to establish residence in the United States, In 1955, 
our office assisted the brother, also a Derivative Citizen, in petitioning for her. 
Later, her citizenship was reinstated due to change in the law and on December 6, 
1961, she entered the United States with a ■ U, S, Passport and on parole until her 
status was decided by the Department of State, 

We assisted with the petitions and affidavits for the husband and five children 
when her United States citizenship was definitely established; not failing to mention 
her application for derivative citizenship. Finally^ in September, 19-2, the husband 
arrived with two minor children; two children over the age of 21 came in January, 
I963 under the 2nd preference; and a married daughter is waiting for a fourth prefer- 
ence quota number, to complete the picture. 

This area, with its many nationalities and many varied problems, is a challenge 
to our work of assimilation and assistance to the persons of "foreign origin" and for 
whom, daily, we add our bit to build for our State and Country, 



FALL RIVER OFFICE 

The Fall River Office, serving thirty-two localities in Southeastern Hrss-chu- 
setts, terminated its fiscal year with a total of 3,-fft services rendered to l,oltf 
inaividuals who sought help with citizenship or immigration problems These figures 
ao riot record other services rendered such as telephone inquiries or newcomer letters 
sent to all new arrivals in this area. During the past ten years, the communities of 
southeastern Massachusetts have become more dense-ly populated with the growth of Otis 
Air Force Base at Falmouth, Massachusetts and the smaller communities surrounding the 
New Bedford and Fall River areas. The ethnic population of the Southeastern Massa- 
chusetts area is dominantly Portuguese and with numerous Immigration Laws during the 
past eight years or so have opened the door to many immigrants from Portugal. 

Portugal is a^ country with a small quota and many a newcomer leaves close' rela- 
tives behind. He i 3 aware that English is important, not only for better jobs, but 
also for United States naturalization. He is also aware that in order to unite his 
family in the United States, American citizenship is most essential. This office 
cooperates closely with the Adult Education Programs of Fall River and New Bediord 
and stresses upon the newcomer the importance of an education acquiring English and 
knowledge of the principles of our Government. A monthly list of applicants apoly- 
^i^ 3 ° ff1 ^ f°r citizenship is forwarded to the Supervisors of Adult Education 
in this area so that they may recruit eligible applicants for classes to prepare for 
the examination winch the Federal Government and the law requires for naturalization. 

P,tnh^h^ eh n ° ±mpa ? t ° £ ° Uban Rcfu i' GCS has b ^n felt to this area, there have been 
RpI? ^ in T^u 1 COi ™ ities > Mattapoisett and New Bedford, several homes of 
^t? T °f ^ ba 2 anC ' SpGnish ^tionality. These are teaching orders and 

?erl 1,1 wl^° ^ i° T th ? SpaniSh SpGakLn ^ Riert0 Ric ^ s > as weil ™ the Cape 
Verde Islanders, have been of great benefit to these particular groups. 

mjw T of r whoT ZZ t + h ?; rt ^ onc Guban bora ™ns, ^ well as nineteen Spanish born nuns, 
mw of whom, among this group, we are assisting in adjusting their own status to 
that of permanent residents. 

urtt^ nf hJ ?rt SC ? efUSC ? f"? 6 Pr ° eram has been fclt ln thc Fal1 Ri ^ °rea ***» the 

T these GhZJTr %$*** fCmili ° S ^^ th ° ?ast fiscal **** With the ^rival 
ol these Chinese farailies, numerous Chinese throughout this area arc now preparing 

petitions for issuance of immigration visas in behalf of their relatives/ 

vpn,nnnhi W °f kl0ad *? ™^ ration h * s mc ^ technicalities and difficulties and it is 
w n t^L- e ^ J? 1S m ° re tijnG cons ™^g Mm* that of citizenship. There 
. 1 nCr f S ?. in ™ipatxon forms completed at this office during thc oast year. 

of i^i^tion v?^^ arC ; a¥ar ?, that UnlcSS thc ^ c ^ lctc - Petition for issuance 
or M S !^ Z ^ affldavit of ^pport, it is unlikely that their relatives 
Le,o L have the opportunity of emigrating to the United States. They 

Sat some dav tL'W^f I***** ^ 0ta SystGn and WG assist in Procedures in the hopes 
Sited States. relat ^ may qualify for an immigration visa and enter the 

awaitS" S ?h^% thGre ±S S l^ baCkl °^ ° f ^tu^osc third preference applicants 
SLr iS 6 ' the latest report from the Department of State shows that 
involvr^ Z f tcred prior to January 16, l 9 k$ are now being allowed visas. This 
involves an extreme hardship and separation of husband and wife due to the fact that 

k carveS'oeSin' ** ""^ *? ^ ** **°*' Jt ±S h °^ d th ^ -ithin t^ next 
many haSsM os wh^h ^T ^ sl ^°* ** change our immigration laws and relieve 
many hardships which exist in this area at the present time. 



In the pest fiscal year, a total of 319 citizenship applications were completed 
at this office and forwarded to the United States Immigration and Naturalization 
Service for final action. This Agent has spoken at graduation exercises of the Adult 
Civil Education classes in Fall River and New Bedford and at other civic functions© 
The Fall River Office has always maintained cooperation and working relations with 
the numerous school departments and all social welfare agencies in the Southeastern 
Massachusetts area. 

LAWRENCE OFFICE 

CUBAN CRISIS i The grim words tumbled into the sua of world affairs and sent 
frightening ripples of apprehension throughout the world - free and enslaved. 
Refugees turned to our shores in a tidal wave of humanity fleeing the oppression of 
Castro-Communism; a tidal wave that swept all*. the way to Massachusetts, including 
Lawrence and Lowell. During the past year, this office was inundated with requests 
from Cubans; when, where and how to register every three months; how to bring rela- 
tives from Cuba; where to find employment; how to obtain immigration visas. The walls 
of our office echoed with such expressions as: "No, I don't have a passport." "I 
stowed away on a ship leaving Cuba." "I escaped into Mexico." "I came on a visa 
waiver," "I want permanent residence in the United States." "How can I join the 
American Army? I want to go back and help fight Castro." 

Complacency cannot survive in our office. The stark reality of man's inhumanity 
to man is tragically apparent whenever a Cuban Refugee walks through our doors re- 
questing assistance. "Cuba" was the overwhelming watchword in the Lawrence District 
Office during the last fiscal year. 

However, Cubans were not alone with problems. Clients from sixty- two other 
countries sought our services during the last fiscal year a The predominant question 
was, "When are they going to change the quota?" Family ties appear to be stronger 
among people from the Mediterranean area. let, these are the countries where quota 
restrictions are separating brother from brother or father from daughter. A special 
law passed last September has served to alleviate some of the hardships of family 
separation. Thus, we were able to assist' an elderly Greek- American widower from 
Lowell to be reunited with his only child, a married daughter, whom he had not seen 
in thirty-five years. The case of an AmericarWborn boy who was taken to the Soviet 
Union fifteen years ago by his mother appears to be headed for a happy conclusion. 
The boy recently informed his father, who remained in the United States, that he 
believes the Soviet Foreign Ministry will shortly be giving him permission to leave 
Russia. This office has been working actively on this case for the past four years. 

This has been an extremely active year at the Lawrence District Office. Again, 
as in the previous year, the agent was interviewed ov^r Lawrence Radio Station '. 
W-C-C-M. The Agent was invited to speak on immigration before the Lawrence Exchange 
Club and several articles appeared in Lawrence and Lowell newspapers regarding the 
functions of this office. 

All newly arrived immigrants to this area were welcomed in xjriting Many persons 
with personal problems, not knowing where to turn, were interviewed and referred to 
the proper resources „ Translations and contacts with public and private agencies in 
the United States and abroad helped round out a most eventful and busy year. 

A glowing feeling of satisfaction through accomplishment has resulted from the 
knowledge that we, in the Lawrence District Office, were able to be of assistance to 
nearly two thousand individuals during the last fiscal year. 



i 






STATISTIC/, 



Services 
For the Fiscal Yea r 7/1/62 - 6/3O/63 

I. INFORl^IATIOr ; ' 1,802 



1. Booklets, forms, blank s_ 

2. Citizenship 

3. 
h. 
5. 



318 



717 



Immigration 

Travel [ 

Other 



33J 



TU 



191 



II. FORMS FILLED 



311 



6. 

7o 

8 e 

9. 
10. 

11. 
12. 

13. 

111. 
15. 
16. 

17. 
18. 

19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 
2U. 

25. 
26. 

27. 

28. 

29. 
30. 
'31. 
32. 
33. 
31. 
35. 
36. 
37. 
38. 
39. 
UO. 
111. 



AR-11 



20 



DSP-70 

DSP-78( Cuban Waiver) 

FS-1497 ; 

FS-510 

G-2 

1-53 
1-90 



1 



7 



22 



"57 



IF 



I-129B 
I-130J 

1-131. 

1-laO 



129 



6 



1-212 (Per. to reenter 

I-256A 

I-290B 



after Pep. )1 



I-U6 U 

I-I485 (Registry) 
I-ii85(Sec. 215)" 
1-506 ' 

1-539 

1-55 

1-591 

1-600 

1-601 



h 



lo 






k1 



DETAIL 



Given 



2,705 



38 



~T2ir 

T7BH7 



unr 



W 



1,352 



179 



69 



17 

IF 



29 



20 



w 



31 



62 



9 



3 



3 




« to 
S §3 



Office 



2 5 187 



I1I8 



390 



135 



50 



8U4 



at 



3,1*11 



305 



933 



1.339 



4J23 



11 



926 



70 



T 



b 



103 



W 



TT 



7 



1 



1 



7 



18" 



9U 



1 



I- 612 (Exch. Student Waiver )_ 

Other Immig, Forms 

N-300 

N-uOO 



w 



10 



202 



N-U01 
N-U02" 
N-U26' 
N-U53" 



6F 



3 



31 



12 



1 



3 



79 



7 



IUT 



1 



7U 



o 

CO 

o 



i~3 



11 Offic 



I*30U 



1,731 
""552" 



u 



ISI 



71 



339 



5,713 



IT 



11*6 



231 



6 



3 



17 1 



232 



32 



78 



17 



3" 



IT 



TI5- 



u 



2 



2 



7 



1 



¥ 



13 



102 



1U5 



138 



cs 



180 



"030" 



"imr 



17 



582 



261 



23 



7 



7 



lb 



21 



70 



N-56 5 

N-585 

N-600 

Other Natur, Forms 



9 



To 



7 



13 



5 






nr 



T 



7 



w 



11 



"26" 



35 



"23^ 



37 



~29lT 



17 



1 



~6~ 



5 



lo" 



230 



72 



132 



1,299 



7 



7 



130 



17 



96 



T 



7 



7 



IT 



IF 



W 



97 



32F 



IT 



17,1409 



2^860 



3772U 

' .V ^ ,- g" 



8,920 
1,216 



W 



9,616 



U89 



HT 



122 



207 



17F 



"270" 



1M339 



FU2" 



17 



908 



299 



TU 



X 
12 

^7" 

23 



"II 

37T 



IF 



3 

"2U2 



•179 



2,129 



230 



33 37- 



lHo~ 
127 

3HT" 

TT 



(Over) 



III. EXECUTION OF AFFIDAVITS 



V, 



U2. Affidavit of Support 
U3o Affidavit of Facts 



Uu Certificate of Idoneity 

US. U.S.S.R. Exit Permit [ 

I46. Polish Assurance 

k7. Other Notarial 



IV. OTHER SERVICES 



I48. Change of Status ( Cards )_ 

i;9o Appearance at Hearings 

50 Interpretation & Trans 

5>1 Letters 

52, Other 



lb o 



INTERVIEW 



5u Newcomer Interview^ 
TOT A..L S 



1$ 

•3 H 



U31 



116 



2 



loir 



U3U 



22 

T 



17 



35T 



IF 



276 



276 



3,75U 



o 



27U 



171 



29 



T 



9 



931 



50 



3 

HIT 



6E3 



90 



82 



ch 



h9 



EH 
CO 

r-q 
o 

o 



o 

EH 
O 



82 



5,3hU 



l.b'0 



97 



362 



1 



3 



1? 



a 






306 



28 



U39 
2U 



"F 



"2C 



o 



2o 



35U 



35U 



3,311 



T£o 



133 



133 

5,271 



2, ,U96 

2,17U 
2^ 



77 
T 

11 
203 



7,933 
U09 



172 
T732F 
~6y02T 

7 



1,595 
25,0^6 






EH 

C 



3,713 

2,ol2 
66 

— or 
13 
— 5r 

10,0U8 

$33 
1,626 

180 

2,UU0 
2,UU0 
U3,226 



FALL 

RIVER 



LAWRENCE SRtlNGFIELD WORCESTER BOF.TO!? TOTAL 



ETHNIC AND NATIONALITY STATISTICS 



2, 

3. 
Ac 



6 



1 



6. 
J?. 

r , 

11. 

12 * 

13 o 
Hu 

15. 

16. 
17. 

lo. 

19. 
20. 
21. 
22. 

23. 
2k. 

25o 
26. 

27. 
2o. 

29. 
30. 
31. 
32. 
33, 

3U. 

35. 
36. 
37c 
32. 
39, 
10. 

iil. 

42. 

h3. 

hh. 

h$. 
U"6. 

U7« 

-9. 
SO. 

51. 

52. 



j-a barna 
Algeria 
Antigua 
Arabia 



Argentina^ 

^rr.u-.ia (R< 
Australia __ 
Austria 
Bahamas 

Belgium 

Bermuda 

Bolivia 

Br z ail 

Br Guiana 

Bulgaria " 

Canada 



1 



or T 



2 

IT 



2 

IT 



IF 

"IT 



Ceylon 

Chile 

China_ 

Colombia 
Costa Ric, 
Cuba 



Cyprus 

Czec ho Slovakia 



Danzig__ 
Denmark 



Dominican Republic 
Ecuado r 

Egypt 

El Salvador 

Engl v.i id 

E Estoni a 
Finl and 

Formosa 

France _ 
Germ 



Ghana 



y. 



Greece 
Guatemala 

Haiti 



Honduras 
Hong Kong" 
Hungary 

Iceland 

India 



Indonesia 

Iran " 

Iraq 



Irel.and 
IsraolJ 

Italy 



"2eIT 



5 



V 



n 



62 



13 



92 



36 



20 



o 



a 



o 



0$ 



13 



7 



10 



135 611 



73" 



30 



wr 



u 



7 



13 



32 



132 



7575" 

o7 



TUG 



mr 



T 



1 



1 

125" 



bO 



3 



10 



7 



V 1 rr 

00 



3 

356' 



113 



77 



3o 



20 



10 



15" 



"F 



T 



6 

"FbT 



17 

"17 



1 

tut 



7 



23 



TUT 



6 



T3T 
3H1 



159 



5 

T 



19 



7 



_F 
2 



213 



hit 



12 



20 



"226" 






A2 



21 



5 



3 



2j2 



11 



00 



"2F 



11 



T 



10 



61 



397 



W 



57 



373 



129 



70 



03 



1, 



3^ 



6 



U 



F 



1 



27 



^2 



j 



33 



13 



109 



35E 
9 



"53 



W 



19 



39 



?3 



2 



3 



"2eT 



159 



mr 



7 



15 



32 



12 



"39" 



77 



373 



26 



IF 



lOd 



13 



T 



"3S> 



3 



o 



6 



152 



13 



1,U16 



197 



10 



12 

o n 



332 



127 



32 



37 

IFF 



"~3 
"273 



93 
33" 







cW 







19 



u 



3HT 



o 



- 29 

1 3 276 



lul 



71 



353 



9 
"FT 



1 



3h 



~*S 



1/ 





51 



yo 



35" 



32 



99 



503 



697 OT 



1,107 l,99 h 



n 



?i 

Iff 






"609 

-rr- 



3 



22: 



-"9 



i£ 



1,116 5,077 7 



*CT 



i.-^ 



(Over) 



FALL 

_ _L g SPRI _ TOItCSSTJ I _ T L 

53. Jamaica - = 217 1 kk2 660 

55. 
56. 
57 c 
50. 

59 c 
60 
61, 
62. 
63 o 

6J4o 

65, 

66 . 

67, 

60 

69. 
70o 

71. 

72. 

73. 
7U. 

75. 
76. 



Japan 


13 


10 


71 


37 


73 


209 


Jori 


- 


u 


12 


11 


20 


17 


Kenya 


- 


- 


- 


7 


3 


10 


Korea 


2 


2 


7 


2cJ 


56 


95 


Latvia 


S 


10 


o 
7 


' £ 


' 13U 


163 


Lebanon 


29 


225 


U3 


55 


(39 


Ma 


Liberia 


■» 


.... 


- 


rm 


29 


29 


Libya 


- 


•** 


— 


1 


10 


11 


Lithuania 


- 


WL 


3 


lie 


233 


395 


Macau 


7 


m 


- 


■■ 


»»j 


7 


Malaya 


■» 


m 


— 


- 


1 


1 


Malta 


— 


*-• 


—» 


2 


- 




Mexic o 


9 


U2 


6 


5 


96 


15 c 


Montserrat 


ma 


Mt 


-• 


« 


185 


li>5 


Morocco 




2 
16 


1 


1 


36 


U0 


Netherlands 


12 


17 


93 


1U2 


New Zealand 


u» 


»* 


•* 


5 


2 


7 


Nicaragua 


■■ 


- 


2 


.- 


17 


19 


Norway 


65 


3 


7 


30 


25 


131 


Other Countries 


«^» 


9 


'35 


15 


o5 


lUli 


Pakistan 


im 


1 


- 


7 


ll 


19 


Palestine 


■* 


2U 


■V 


1 


29 


5U 


Panama 


i 


r 


6 


9m 


73 


6U 



77 . Peru * ~ 23 \ 02 105. 

78o Philippines 17 ' 16~" 2k I^T 2u6 327, 

79 o Poland 12l+ 31U '226 510 1,060 2,236 

60, Portugal 2 3 l c0 126 109 53T 722" 3,13k 

61c Puerto Rice ~~~~ -. 2k 1 U ~2 9_ 

62 o RuiTiani a 2 7 1U 17 55 9? 

63 ^ Saudi Arabia « 1 



Gil* Scotland 11 jgj 77 52 199 367 

0$ o South Africa 1 «. ZT i ^0 S 

66, Spain 15 1 0~~ 2U 5 7%. 13? 

67=, Sudan Z 'k " - - 2 6" 



06 c. Swede n 15 I" 9__ 62 tk " 15J L 

09 o Switzerland - 27 _7 1 66 10T 

90. Syria « ol 9 17 57 l£5" 



91. Thailand = 2 U . ~~6 

92 Trinidad ■ - 2 __5_ 2 "61 70 

93 e Turke y 5 37 .19 \ 3o jCT '3kg _ 

9U* Ukraine 2 *> ■ _■_■ " "'2 ; - j?2 5& 

95o u.s.s.r" lo" HIT" 59 HIT 323 -W? 



96, United States 1Q1 U05 I163 922' 2.,6U9 . U,670 .._ 

97. Uruguay 3_ 2 - 6 11 ._gg 

96 c Venezuela J£ 1 « - ok 65 

99. Vietnam «.'.'„ 2 k 6 ~~ 

100. Wales -» - 356 

101. West Indies (Other) _ = _ 13 20 lie 159 

102. Yugoslavia •■ . 1 ~ g _- 166_ 20o 

TOT A L 3775u 5,3kk 3 9 UW '"5,271 2$,0Ut k3,226 



'IscrJ. iV-- r - 7/1/:" 2 - '/3-A3 ALL OFFICES 

LOCALITIES '-- ■ . 

FALL- RIVER LAWRENCE SPRINGFIELD- WORCESTER . BOSTON TOT;X 



Abingt oh 


mm 


— 


- 


M 


9 


9 


Acton- 


- 


— 


"■• 


1 


15 


16 


Acushnet 


26 


— 


- 


- 


- 


26 


Adams 


— 


— 


3 


*• 


6- 


9 


Agawam 


- 


— 


55 


- 


- 


~T? 


Amesbury'- ■ 


- 


15 


- 


if 


6 


21 


Amherst "' 


- 


1 


50 


~ 


5 


TS 


Andovor 


— 


162 


*«• 


- 


10 


172 


Arlington 


— 


k 


'mm 


n, 


351 


3^ 


Ashland 


- 


— 


- 


2 


m 


16 


Athol • 


— 


— 


— 


3 


— 


3 


Attlebo'ro ■ 


o3 


,. — 


** 


.- 


27 


110 


Auburn 


mm 


-, 


tmt 


-96 


- 


96 


Avon 


-. 


— 


- 


•• 


10 


10 


Ayer 


- 


22 


— 


5 


. 66 


"9F 


Barnstable 






mm 




S9 


59 


Bar re 


mm 


— 


M 


9 


1 


10 


Bedford 


— 


_. *■• 


1 


. — 


1 


2 


Belling ham 


- 


mm 


- 


mm] 


11 


11 


Belmont 


— 




- 


mm 


2ou 
1 


2ob' 


Berlin 


— 


V 


— 


— 


T_ 


Beverly 


- 


... 2 


— 


-, 


77 


79 


Billerica 


— 


.. 11 


— 


- 


^ 


66 


Bolton 


— 




— 


2 


' •- 


n 


Boston 


5 


. U6 


M 


17 


11,336 


11 3 U0U 


Bourne 


7 


— 


P^ 


— 


11 


IcJ 


Boxford 


— 


— 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Boylston 


— 


M 


|M 


U6 


- 


"S3 


Braintrce 


- 


— 


— 


— 


99 


99 


Bridgowater 


3 


-. 


— 


~ 


16 


19 


Brimfield 


- 


mm 


•m 


— 


3 


<5 


Brockton 


- 


2 


•m 


mm 


232 


2C5 


Brookfield 


~ 


- 


— 


29 


- 


2° 


Brookline 


- 


9 


- 


- 


7hh 


753 



Burlingt o n •" -■ - g Z 31 37 

Cambridge -, 6 1 l,55l lj5£Q 

Canton " • ■. 2 - - 32 3J4" 

Carlisle I ~ ^ [J U 

C har It o n ■ * ~ 32 1 3_£ 

Chatham "~"~~~" I . I ■ • ~ 2 



Chelmsford - . 56 ~ 12 6>J 

Chelsea , ' ~ I 27 5 2TH 

Cheshire '. -. Z " " "J" ~ ~~Z~ 

Chester „. 5 7 



Chic ope e , cp^ ~ Q 

Clinto n ' - Z 97 7 lCii 

Cohasset ■ - *Z ' " Z Z 1 3 "j5 

Concord ' ... Z Z Z 63 IB 



FALL RIVER' L/JIUENCE SPRINGFIELD WORCESTER BOSTON TOTAL 



Delivers 




— 


2U 


m 


— 


21 


U5 


Dartmouth 




IK 


** 


- 


- 


- 


u6 


Dec! ham 




- 


- 


- 


- 


7U 


7o- 


Doerfiold 




■■ 


— 


K 


- 


- 


6 


Dennis 




— 


— 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Dighton 




13 


- 


- 


- 


1 


1U 


Dover 




— 


- 


— 


M| 


"Z " 


6 


Dracut 




— 


DU 


— 


- 


u 


76 


Dudley 




- 


— 


— 


72 


- 


72 


Dunstable 




- 


n 




— 


- 


- 


o 


Duxbury 




M| 


— 


- 


- 


9 


9 


East Bridget 


'ater 




«■• 


»* 


. 


2 


2 


East Longmcc 


.dow 


- 


- 


17 


- 


- 


17 


Easthampton 




MJ 


•^ 


11 


- 


- 


11 



East on 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 


9 


Essex 


- 


— 


- 


- 


3 


_i 


Everett 


mm 


11 


— 


5 


U77 


U93 


Fairhaven 


' 72 








1 


' 73 


Fall River 


2 5 0G9 


- 


- 


- 





2,097 


Falmouth 


35 


Mj 


— 


-. 


16 


Bl 


Fitchburg 


— 


- 


— 


WL 





~U9 


Foxborough 


— 


— 


•m 


- 


16 


16 


Framingham 


~ 


i 


-. 


3 


16U 


172 


Franklin 


— 


— 


-. 


— 


30 


30 


Freetown 


2 


■a 


- 


— 


Ml 


2 


Gardner 


• 






Sh 


17 


71 


Georgetown 


-. 


3 


— 


— 


21 


20 


Gloucester 


MR 


- 


— 


- 


93 


93 


Goshen 


— 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Grafton 


- 


— 


— 


02 


- 


G2 


Granby 


- 


- 


11 


M| 


Mfl 


11 


Granville 


- 


mm 


k 


-. 


- 


y 


Great Barrington 


~ 


•m 


17 


— 


1 


1G 


Greenfield 


- 


- 


12 


■M 


1 


1? 


Groton 


- 


3 


— 


— 


3 


6 


Grove land 


- 


1 


- 


•» 


1 


2 


Hadley 


MB 




7 






7 


Hamilton 


M» 


— 


Mt 


— 


22 


22 


Hampden 


- 


Ml 


11 


— 


- 


11 


Hanover 


- 


- 


— 


— 


1 


1 


Hanson 


- 


- 


Ml 


— 


12 


12 


Hardwick 


— 


— 


10 


■3 


- 


~1S 


Harvard 


- 


— 


Ml 


— 


k 


k 


Hatfield 


— 


— 


3 


— 


- 


3 


Haverhill 


- 


&D7 


- 


1 


1*0 


hho 


Hingham 


- 


— 


— 


- 


36 


& 


Holbrook 


- 


MM 


— 


- 


Ul 


"Hi 


Ho Id en 


- 


— 


— 


76 


- 


2E 


Holliston 


- 




- 


U - 


9 


13 



FALL RIVER LAVJRENCE SPRINGFIELD WORCESTER BOSTON TOT/i 



Holyoke 


im 


mm 


292 


- 


h 


296 


Hope dale • 




-4 


- 


o 


—• 


C 


Hopkinton- 


■ •-— ■ 


- 


- 


2 


7 


9 


Hubbard st on 


— 


•m 




7 


- 


7 


Hudson 


— 


Wt% 




9 . 


3G 


~u7 


Hall 


- 


M 


m% 


- 


59 


"59 


Ipswich 




3 




«• 


23 


26 


Lakeville • 


ll 








12 


16 


Lancaster 


— 


- 


m, 


3J 


Hi 


^2 


Lawrence 


•M 


2,33e 


mm 


— 


33 


2*371 


Leicester 


- 


- 


- 


71* 


- 




Lenox 


- 


— 


2 


Mi 


2 


"T 


Leominster- 


— 


1 


- 


23 


11 


35 


Lexington ■ 


■ - 


3 


— 


MB 


109 


112 


Line oln 


- 


-. 


mmj 


- 


22 


22 


Littleton 


~ 


1 


mm 


— 


12 


13 


Longmeadow-- 


— 


- 


23 


mm 


- 


' 2^ 


Lowell 


3 


1,3*39 


— 


- 


09 


l,Uol 


Ludlow 


» 


tm 


WJ 


- 


m* 


TC7 


Lunenburg 


— 


mi 


•m 


- 


3 


3 


Lynn 


- 


3 


mm 


Ml 


lj.ll 


I41S 


Lynnfield 


- 


•» 


— 


- 


11 


ll 


Maiden 


■ - 


3 




mm 


266 


269 


Manchester . 


— 


M 


mm 


- 


h 


"J 


Mansfield - 


5 


■M 


— 


Ml 


3 






Marble he ad 


- 


mm 


M 


Ml 


22 


22 


Marion 


k 


— 


mm 


M 


1 


1 


Marlborough. 


— 


- 


_ 


1 


U7 


' U6 


Marshfield 


- 


- 


— 


mi 


13 


13 


Mattapoisett 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


9 



Maynard , _. ""I 27 27 

Medfiel ~ Z Z 1 ~ 33 3I+ 

Medford .. ~ ' [;22 U2~2 

Medwa y ~ II I ' Z. 9 9 

Melrose "* Z" I 3 90 93 

Merrimac I 12 Z ' I ~ 12 

Mcthue n 313 ~~ ! Z k 317 

Middleboroug h Z ~ Z 7 "7 

Middle to n 1 — " -.55 

Milford - T 1 3^ 2o 12 3_ 

Millbur ~ „ — Z Z G O , UU 

Millis I ~ Z 17 17 

Millvillc " , ~ 1 Z ~Z 1 1 

Milt o n „ uQ od 

Monson , _ 15 - - 1,5 

Montague " -. ~ J3 , "TJ 

Nahant ; -. .. - - 11 11 

N antucket . ~ Z » ZT 1 T 

Natick ;- .. .. g 9o 9e 

Needham ; ~ , ^ "~Z ' 1 23 123 



Fi.LL RIVER LA17RENCE SPRINGFIELD WORCESTER BOSTON TOTAL 



Now Bedford 


97h 


■i 


- 


- 


20 


1,002 


Newbury 


*** 


u 


- 


mm 


2 


6 


Nowburyport 


— 


7 


- 


— 


7 


Hi 


N cut on 


- 


2 


mm 


- 


7^ 


750 


Norfolk 


- 


- 


- 


- 


u 


1 r. 


North Adams 


— 


- 


lu 


- 


1 


19 


North And over 


- 


123 


— 


- 


-. 


123 


North Attleborough 


1 


- 


- 


- 


3 


U 


North Reading 


- 


h 


- 


- 


13 


17 


Northampton 


- 


- 


3U 


- 


3 


37 


Northborough 


— 


- 




52 


1 


53 


Northbridgc 


.— 


— 


- 


16 


- 


16 


Norton 


3 


-. 


- 


- 


£ 


O 


Norwell 


- 


mm 


— 


- 


li 


U 


Norwood 


— 


- 


mm 


■p 


163 


163 


Oakham 


•* 






2 


mm 


2 


Orange 


— 


— 


— 


— 


2 


2 


Orleans 


2 


— 


wm 


- 


3 


5 


Otis 


— 


- 


1 


- 


- 


1 


Oxford 




- 


- 


62 


mm 


62 


Palmer 






32 




9 


ill 


Paxton 


mm 


— 


- 


kl 


- 


Ul 


Peabody 


- 


26 


W*m 


- 


129 


155 


Pembroke 


— 


_ 


- 


— 


21* 


2k 


Pepperell 


— 


1 


- 


- 


12 


13 


Petersham 


— 


mm 


— 


2 


- 


2 


Pittsfield 


— 


-i 


10 


- 


u 


1U 


Plainville 


— 


— 


- 


- 


1 


1 


Plymouth 


— 


— 


mm 


- 


1U 


Hi 


Princeton 


«• 


- 


mm 


mm 


2 


2 



Provincetown 2 - - - 3 5 

Quincy - - ~ _ _ : _ _ 'v-. 1 U6l 

Randolph -. - '> U6 i;6 

Raynha m u ~ 1 9 

Reading - = - *"_ _~ " Jo 2o' 

Revere - 3 -_ ' ~ " 270 273 

Rochester , \ 2 ■ ' ■« j- __ - 2__ 

Rockland . - : _ __ ;~_ ~ 32 3g 

Roc kp o r t __ 2 - : ' 5 "g 

Rowley . . • __ __- J? 5 

Russell „ - Z - __2: 1 . 

Rutland , • "- _ 3? ■ '"" ,-,: . 33.,, 

Salem 13 - IQd 121 

Salisbury^ ! 30 -• ' - ' - 30 

Saugus = - - ~ - U2 U2~ 

Scituate - - _ - - 79 79 

Seekon k 5 ~ 5 

Sharon " - -7 " - 13 13 





FALL RIVER 


LAWRENCE 


SPRINGFIELD 


WORCESTER 


BOSTON 


TOTAL 


Sholburhe 


_ 




3 


*•» 


1 

7 


h 


Shcrborn 


•m 


- 


- 


7 


Shirley- 


r 


- 


mm 


2 


11 


13 


Shrewsbury 


Ml 


■a 


- 


201 


2 


203 


Somerset 


126 


- 


•m 


- 


2 


12U 


Somerville 


- 


2 


— 


_ 


951 


953 


South Hadley 


- 


- 


20 


— 


2 


22 


Southborough 


3 


- 


MM) 


i 


3 

9 

13 

23 


7 


Southbridge 


- 


- 


2 


G6 


97 


Spencer 


- 


-. 


2 
2,117 


hi 


- 60' 


Springfield 


- 


2 


2,1U2 


Sterling 


- 


- 


— 


•a 


68 
63 


5 


St one ham 


- 


M 


Ml 


6U 


St ought on 


•a 


- 


«-» 


63 


Stow 


- 


- 


-. 


»-» 


19 
20 
2U 


19 


Sturbridge 


•« 


-. 


"■ 


9 
2 

9 


29 


Sudbury 


■s 


— 


26 


Sutton 


- 


- 


Q 


Swampscott 


~ 


- 


•■ 




^7 


57 


Swansea 


Ck 


- 


Ml 


** 


1 
19 


65 


Taunton 


90 


. 


109 


Templet on 


- 


- 


-, 


2 

3 

ll 


1 

17 

1 
1 

1 

90 

bo 


3 


Tcwksbury 


- 


13 


a. 


30 


Topsfield 


- 


M 


^> 


1 


Tyngsborough 


- 


10 


19 


Upton 






- 


3 


Uxbridge 


- 


MM 


15 


Wakefield 




6 


1 


96 


Wales 


- 


1 


Walpole 


•i* 


— 


ON) 


1*0 


Waltham 


■O 


3 


_ 


3 


^oU " 


Slo 


flare 


~ 


-. 


3 


3 


Ware ham 


h 


- 




_ 


E 




Warren 


- 


- 


— 


2 


_ 


2 


Warwick 


- 


- 


_. 


_ 


I 


I 


Watertown 


- 


- 


_. 


n 


6^3 


653 


Wayland 


~ 


■m 


Ml 


136 

Ml 


26 

1 

117 


26 


Webster 


— 


— 


137 


Wellesley 


•■* 


*■•. 


«», 


117 


Wellfleet 


3 


- 


MB 


3 


West Boylston 


- 


XI 


_ 


^0 


1 
k 


$1 


West Bridgewater 


- 


— 


«• 


Li" 


West Brookfield 


- 


- 


w 


23 


1 


2i* 


West Springfield 


•m 


«!■ 


131 


2k 


9 


131 


Westborough 
Westfield 


- 


- 




33 


- 


Ml 


73 

MB 


- 


10 


13 


Westford 


"j 


5 


1$' 


Westhampton 


- 


M| 


1 


1 



FiXL . . L&JRENCE SPRINGFIELD WORCESTER BOSTON TOTAL 



Westminster 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


Weston 


- 


- 


- 


- 


35 


35 


Westport 


20 


- 


- 


- 


1 


21 


Wcstwc 


- 


•# 


- 


- 


3C 


36 


Weymouth 


- 


■■ 


~ 


- 


153 


153 


Whitman 


- 


— 


- 


- 


10 


10 


Wilbraham 


~ 


- 


19 


- 


- 


19 


Williamsburg 


- 


- 


1 


M 


- 


1 


Wilmington 


- 


3 


- 


- 


21 


2k 


Winchenclon 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U 


k 


Winchester 


- 


mm 


- 


- 


12 U 


12o 


Windsor 


- 


- 


mt 


a* 


2 


2 


Winthrop 


- 


- 


- 


- 


U6 


U6 


Woburn 


at 


■■ 


- 


- 


100 


'100 


Worcester 


- 


1 


2 


3,1+21 


Uk 


3.U6IJ 


Worthington 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2 


Wrentham 


- 


- 


■•) 


- 


36 


36 


Yarmouth 


. 1 


*m 




„ 


6 


7 


Out of State 


MB 


133 


Ul 


U 


322 


505 




3,751; 


5,3hh 


3;tJn 


5,271 


• 


- 


TOTAL 


25,01*6 


1*3,226 





tt'K 



'"•'> v 



««.'» ■ 



HiHBHi hb ' 

MB kHP 



■'../■- 
■■■■--:■-:■ 






.